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Friday, October 31 | Spider Baby at The Academy Theater

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What’s Showing Today? Friday, October 31
Click venue names for ticket info & directions

Featured Screening: Spider Baby at The Academy Theater. Post by Jon Dieringer:

It’s the perfect Halloween screening: tonight Jack Hill is in attendance for the New York premiere of a new 35mm print of Spider Baby, his gonzo cult classic about a family of inbred mental children preying on unexpected house guests. Tickets are only $5, and, because you can’t have too much of a good thing, Maniac director (and incredible Q&A moderator) William Lustig is in attendance to introduce.

An unabashedly silly and seedy, inbred take on the Old Dark House formula, Spider Baby begins, much like the films of Russ Meyer, with a wry nod to the industrial film, as a pipe-chewing ham in a smoking jacket reads from the so-called Dictionary of Rare and Peculiar Diseases. He opens the page to the Merrye Syndrome, a mental condition afflicting descendants of one Ebeneezer Merrye, described as a progressive age reduction beginning at the tenth year: “It is believed that eventually the victim of the Merrye Syndrome will even regress beyond the prenatal level, reverting to a prehuman condition of savagery and cannibalism.”

And so begins the story of “that fateful day, ten years ago” of his own encounter with the Merrye family: nymphoid sisters Elizabeth and Virginia and their primal brother Ralph, played by a young, career-best Sid Haig in his first major starring role. They’re looked after by hapless caretaker  Lon Chaney Jr., and when a pair of cousins and their attorneys arrive to take control of the family estate, Chaney does his best to keep the family skeletons in the closet amid creepy, crawly dinners, and homicidal libidinous advances.

The casting of Wolf Man Lon Chaney is apt: the film is a knowing, low-budget riff on the classic Universal horror films of James Whale (who, granted, never worked with Chaney), raising their barely latent perversity to new levels of gleeful camp abandon. And although it was shot in Los Angeles (at the landmark Victorian Smith Estate, the former home of a noted occult researcher), the feel is pure southern goth: Baby Doll by way of Flannery O’Conner. Though the forumla is apparent, the film is singular: none so perfectly blends classical horror tropes with the fledgling exploitation genre, creating something that is both eminently pleasurable and genuinely disturbing.

The print was preserved by the Academy Film Archive, and its therefore presented at The Academy Theater in midtown, which spotlights the Orphan Film Symposium all weekend with a program titled “The Real Indies.” The programs are uniformly fantastic, so be sure to check out the full schedule. —Jon Dieringer

Today

The Real Indies: A Close Look at Orphan Films at The Academy Theater
Series Details

  • Spider Baby (Jack Hill). Details. Introduced by Jack Hill and hosted by William Lustig. Brand new 35mm print. 1967. 81 min. 7:30 pm.

Industrial Terror at Anthology Film Archives
Series Details

  • Abby (William Girdler) Details. 16mm. 1974. 89 min. 7:00 pm.
  • Homebodies with Live or Die (Larry Yust). Details. 35mm/16mm. 1974. 96 min. 9:30 pm.

Queer Pagan Punk: The Films of Derek Jarman at BAMcinématek
Series Details

  • The Devils (Ken Russell). Details. 35mm. 1971. 109 min. 2:00, 4:30, 7:00 and 9:30 pm.

Scary Movies 8 at Film Society of Lincoln Center
Series Details

  • Cub (Jonas Govaerts). Details. DCP. 2014. 85 min. 6:00 pm.
  • What We Do in the Shadows (Taika Waititi & Jemaine Clement). Details. DCP. 2014. 86 min. 8:00 pm.

Acteurism: The Emergence of Ann Sheridan, 1937-1943 at MoMA
Series Details

  • They Drive by Night (Raoul Walsh). Details. 1940. 95 min. 1:30 pm.

To Save and Project: The 12th MoMA International Festival of Film Preservation at MoMA
Series Details

  • Poppy (Kenji Mizoguchi). Details. 1935. 73 min. 4:30 pm.
  • Miss Okichi (Tatsunosuke Takashima). Details. 1935. 64 min. 6:30 pm.

Filmmaker in Focus: Nuri Bilge Ceylan at MoMA
Series Details

  • Three Monkeys. Details. 2008. 109 min. 4:00 pm.
  • Distant. Details. 2002. 110 min. 7:30 pm.

See It Big! Horror at Museum of the Moving Image
Series Details

  • Poltergeist (Tobe Hooper). Details. 35mm. 1982. 114 min. 7:30 pm.

Night of the Living Dead (George Romero) at Spectacle. Details. HD. 1968. 98 min. 8:00 and 10:00 pm.

Midnight

ABCs of Death 2 (Various) at IFC CenterDetails. HD. 2014. 125 min. 12:00 am.
True Romance (Tony Scott) at IFC CenterDetails. 35mm. 1993. 118 min. 12:10 am.
El Topo (Alejandro Jodorowsky) at IFC CenterDetails. 35mm. 1970. 125 min. 12:15 am.
Friday the 13th (Sean S. Cunningham) at IFC CenterDetails. DCP. 1980. 95 min. 12:20 am.
The Monster Squad (Fred Dekker) at Landmark Sunshine. Details. 1987. 82 min. 12:00 am.
The Curse of Ghoul Friday at Spectacle. Details. 90 min. 12:00 am.

Ongoing

Braddock America (Gabriella Kessler & Jean-Loïc Portron) at Anthology Film Archives. Details. digital. 2013. 100 min. 7:00 pm & 9:15 pm.
Touch of Evil (Orson Welles) at Film Forum. Details. DCP. 1958. 112 min. 12:45, 4:40 and 9:00 pm.
The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (Robert Wiene) at Film Forum. Details. DCP. 1920. 77 min. 3:00 and 7:15 pm.
Goodbye to Language (Jean-Luc Godard) at Film Society of Lincoln Center. Details. 3D DCP. 2014. 70 min. 11:45 am, 1:30, 3:20, 5:30, 7:30, 9:20 pm.
Goodbye to Language (Jean-Luc Godard) at IFC Center. Details. 3D DCP. 2014. 70 min. 10:35, 12:05, 1:45, 3:30, 5:15, 7:05, 8:50, and 10:30 pm.

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Saturday, November 1 | The Shining at Landmark Loew’s Jersey Theatre

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What’s Showing Today? Saturday, November 1
Click venue names for ticket info & directions

Featured Screening: The Shining at Landmark Loew’s Jersey Theatre

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Today

The Real Indies: A Close Look at Orphan Films at The Academy Theater
Series Details

  • Pioneering Women. Details. Presentations of work by Aloha Wanderwell Baker, Newsreel, Geri Ashur, and Connie Field. Field in attendance with presenters Heather linville, Susan Lazarus, and Antonia Lant. 10:00 am.
  • Altered Reality. Details. Work by Standish Lawder, Frank & Caroline Mouris, Bill Brand, Les Blank, Charlie Ahearn, Jeanne Liotta, Lisa Crafts, Esther Shatavsky, and Bill Morrison. Presentations by Pamela Vizner (BB Optics), Heather Linville (Academy Film Archive), Andrew Lampert (Anthology Film Archive), and John Klacsmann (Anthology Film Archive); and composer/violinist Todd Reynolds. 2:00 pm.
  • Visions of New York. Details. Special guests include Commissioner of the New York City Mayor’s Office of Media and Entertainment Cynthia Lopez, filmmakers Bill Morrison, Jimmy Picker, Luis Vale, Steven Siegel, and Phil Buehler; scholars Dan Streible (NYU/Academy Film Scholar), Brian Meacham (Yale University Film Study Center),and Lauren Tilton (Yale University); curators/programmers Ron Magliozzi (MoMA), Bruce Goldstein (Film Forum), Elena Rossi-Snook (New York Public Library), Jeffery Masino (Academy Film Archive), and Roger Mancusi (Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences/NYU). 6:00 pm.

Queer Pagan Punk: The Films of Derek Jarman at BAMcinématek
Series Details

  • The Tempest. Details. DCP. 1979. 95 min. 7:00 and 9:15 pm.

Scary Movies 8 at Film Society of Lincoln Center
Series Details

  • Dark Was the Night (Jack Heller). Details. Q&A with director Jack Heller and actor Kevin Durand. DCP. 2014. 94 min. 6:00 pm.
  • Late Phases (Adrián García Bogliano). Details. Q&A with actor Nick Damici. DCP. 2014. 95 min. 9:00 pm.

To Save and Project: The 12th MoMA International Festival of Film Preservation at MoMA
Series Details

  • Joseph Cornell and Ken Jacobs: Footage Lost and Found. Details. 1940-1955/1985. 75 min. 1:30 pm.
  • Sebastiane (Paul Humfress, Derek Jarman). Details. 1976. 86 min. 4:45 pm.
  • Caravaggio (Derek Jarman). Details. 1986. 93 min. 7:30 pm.

Filmmaker in Focus: Nuri Bilge Ceylan at MoMA
Series Details

  • The Small Town with Cocoon. Details. 1997/1995. 102 min. 4:00 pm.
  • Once Upon a Time in Anatolia. Details. 2011. 157 min. 7:30 pm.

The Korean Horror Picture Show at Museum of the Moving Image
Series Details

  • Sympathy for Lady Vengeance (Park Chan-wook). Details. 35mm. 2005. 112 min. 2:30 pm.

SPECTOBER IV at Spectacle
Series Details

  • Don’t Deliver Us from Evil (Joël Séria). Details. Digital video. 1971. 110 min. 7:30 pm.

Italo-Sleze: B-Movie Meta-Rip-Offs of the 1970s at Spectacle
Series Details

  • Matalo! (Cesare Canevari). Details. Digital video. 1970. 92 min. 10:00 pm.

The Day of the Dead Horror Movie Marathon at Anthology Film Archives. Works announced day-of. Details. 35mm. 12:00pm – 12:00 am.

Midnight

ABCs of Death 2 (Various) at IFC CenterDetails. HD. 2014. 125 min. 12:00 am.
True Romance (Tony Scott) at IFC CenterDetails. 35mm. 1993. 118 min. 12:10 am.
El Topo (Alejandro Jodorowsky) at IFC CenterDetails. 35mm. 1970. 125 min. 12:15 am.
Friday the 13th (Sean S. Cunningham) at IFC CenterDetails. DCP. 1980. 95 min. 12:20 am.
The Monster Squad (Fred Dekker) at Landmark Sunshine. Details. 1987. 82 min. 12:00 am.
Evil Dead II (Sam Raimi) at Nitehawk Cinema. Details. 35mm. 1987. 84 min. 12:05 am.
The Curse of Ghoul Friday at Spectacle. Details. 90 min. 12:00 am.

Ongoing

Braddock America (Gabriella Kessler & Jean-Loïc Portron) at Anthology Film Archives. Details. Digital. 2013. 100 min. 4:45, 7:00 and 9:15 pm.
Touch of Evil (Orson Welles) at Film Forum. Details. DCP. 1958. 112 min. 12:45, 4:40 and 9:00 pm.
The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (Robert Wiene) at Film Forum. Details. DCP. 1920. 77 min. 3:00 and 7:15 pm.
Goodbye to Language (Jean-Luc Godard) at Film Society of Lincoln Center. Details. 3D DCP. 2014. 70 min. 11:45 am, 1:30, 3:20, 5:30, 7:30, 9:20 pm.
Goodbye to Language (Jean-Luc Godard) at IFC Center. Details. 3D DCP. 2014. 70 min. 10:35, 12:05, 1:45, 3:30, 5:15, 7:05, 8:50, and 10:30 pm.

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Thursday, October 30 | The Golden Boat at MoMA

The Golden Boat at Anthology

What’s Showing Today? Thursday, October 30
Click venue names for ticket info & directions

Featured Screening: The Golden Boat at MoMA. Post by Vanessa McDonnell:

In The Golden Boat, a young rock critic for the Village Voice who also dabbles in painting and studies anthropology (Federico Muchnik) follows a trail of empty shoes somewhere around Avenue A and 1st or 2nd Street. He comes upon an unhinged older man (Michael Kirby) who explains that he’s actually from LA and doesn’t belong there, and then proceeds to stab himself in the stomach and bleed for the rest of the movie.

The Golden Boat was the first English-language production for Raul Ruiz, and his collaboration with experimental theater practitioners from the Wooster Group is felt in the film’s surreal language and its syncopated, rapid-fire delivery, punctuated by emphatic statements like, “Take an aspirin. It’s the only medicine we know anything about.” Ruiz was able to not only situate himself firmly within a rarefied late-heyday downtown milieu, with music by John Zorn and cameos by Jim Jarmusch, Kathy Acker and Annie Sprinkle, but masterfully commands both the humor and desolation of a self-contained world of New York artists and leftists, their colloquialisms, inertia and rage.

Michael Kirby goes around stabbing people even as he bleeds, and his character is both funny and threatening, throwing out words of wisdom like “There’s nothing I hate more than when people get that look on their face that says ‘With whom have I fallen in’,” “Doctors know what they’re doing,” and “All I did was follow my star.” Having fallen in deeply with him, Muchnik is witness to plenty of stabbings and becomes enmeshed in an absurd drama involving a telenovela star and her jealous husband and co-star, both of whom Kirby is supposedly trying to kill. “Doc” (a virtuosic Brett Alexander, in his only credited screen appearance) is Kirby’s sidekick of sorts, though they argue and stab each other, and he is said to perform surgery on the sidewalk on Avenue A. He also dispenses sage advice, like, “Somebody is always filming you. That’s why you have to keep your manners day and night. Life is hard, like my brain.” Throughout the film, Ruiz switches to black and white from color at times when the narrative subtly edges towards the self-reflexively referential, like when private eye types bemoan their fates, or a hit man (played by Vito Acconci) murders the wrong man but can’t accept it, saying, “I’m Swiss, I can’t be wrong. I’m Swiss, I can’t be wrong,” over and over and over again. —Vanessa McDonnell

Also Noted

Artist Vito Acconci and filmmaker Mary Harron join The Mekons’ John Langford for discussion at Columbia University along with authors Jonathan Franzen, Luc Sante and Greil Marcus. All are interview subjects in Revenge of the Mekons, currently running at Film Forum, a winding chronicle of the egalitarian leftist rock band, now well into its third decade of continuous existence, and perhaps imminently secure in its place in the middlebrow cultural canon. (I just noticed dude from The Hold Steady is introducing one of the screenings.) Whatever: their records are phenomenal. (Sorry fans of The Hold Steady and Jonathan Franzen, please don’t unsubscribe from Screen Slate.)

Today is also the jumpoff of BAMcinématek‘s Derek Jarman retrospective. Though many of the better-known features screen from DCP (thankfully not Blue — if that ever happens, I will light myself on fire in front of Film Forum), the highlights are 35-and-16mm presentations of short-form self-portraits, documentation of collaborators, and music videos involving Throbbing Gristle, The Smiths and Brian Eno, which are folded into several programs.

Here’s a hot tip tho: amid fierce competition, there is nothing more punk in New York City repertory cinema tonight than the soundtrack for The Satanist. Unseen in New York for forty years until Monday night, sexploitation auteur Zoltan G. Spencer‘s diabolical debut, considered a lost film until a 35mm print was very recently rediscovered, is like the Jeanne Dielman of occult softcore pornography. Shot on the cheap without sync sound, it’s full of overlong scenes of topless dry humping and Vaseline rubbing that will obliterate your sense of time, place, and being, all strung together with a Velvet Underground-esque dirty psychedelic jam of questionable competency but maximally satisfying returns. Also noteworthy is the impressive ram’s head mask featured in the climactic ritualistic orgy. It screens with Spencer’s previous industrial film, Breakthrough, which details four mining teams’ work to meet at the center of an ambitious mountain tunneling project and is full of pneumatic drills, pumping pistons, dirty men ramming sticks of dynamite into tight holes, and other Freudian delights. Also showing tonight is the raw, rough-and-tumble cult biker film Northville Cemetery Massacre, which is absolutely stunning on Anthology Film Archives‘s Courthouse screen from co-director William Dear‘s own 35mm print. It’s a gory, Peckinpah-esque urban western shot in Detroit that climaxes in an explosive cemetery shootout—and it screens with a 16mm print of the directors’ preceding drug education film, Jump. —Jon Dieringer

Today

Industrial Terror at Anthology Film Archives
Series Details

  • Northville Cemetery Massacre with Jump (William Dear & Thomas L. Dyke) Details. 35mm/16mm. 1976. 86 min. 6:45 pm.
  • The Satanist (Zoltan G. Spencer) with Breakthrough (as Spence Crilly). Details. 35mm/Digital video. 1968. 64 min. 9:15 pm.

Queer Pagan Punk: The Films of Derek Jarman at BAMcinématek
Series Details

  • Jubilee. Details. DCP. 1978. 103 min. 7:00 and 9:30 pm.

Acteurism: The Emergence of Ann Sheridan, 1937-1943 at MoMA
Series Details

  • They Drive by Night (Raoul Walsh). Details. 1940. 95 min. 1:30 pm.

Filmmaker in Focus: Nuri Bilge Ceylan at MoMA
Series Details

  • Once Upon a Time in Anatolia. Details. 2011. 157 min. 4:00 pm.
  • Climates. Details. 2006. 101 min. 7:30 pm.

To Save and Project: The 12th MoMA International Festival of Film Preservation at MoMA
Series Details

  • The Iron Mask (Allan Dwan). Details. 1929. 95 min. 4:30 pm.
  • The Golden Boat (Raul Ruiz). Details. Introduced by James Schamus, Scott Macaulay, and Jordi Torrent, and Christine Vachon. 1990. 83 min. 7:15 pm.

SPECTOBER IV at Spectacle
Series Details

  • Blood Theatre (Rick Sloan). Details. Digital video. 1984. 75 min. 7:30 pm.
  • Don’t Deliver Us from Evil (Joël Séria). Details. Digital video. 1971. 110 min. 10:00 pm.

Lightning Over Braddock (Tony Buba) at Anthology Film Archives. Details. 16mm. 1988. 80 min. 7:00 pm.
We Are Alive!: The Fight to Save Braddock Hospital (Tony Buba & Tom Dubensky) at Anthology Film Archives. Details. digital. 2013. 67 min. 9:00 pm.
Revenge of the Mekons Panel Discussion at Columbia University Davis Auditorium. Discussion with John Langford, Vito Acconci, Katherine Dieckmann, Jonathan Franzen, Mary Harron, Greil Marcus and Luc Sante. 7:30 pm.
The Lodger (Alfred Hitchcock) at Nitehawk Cinema. Details. Live score by Morricone Youth. 1927. 68 min. 9:30 pm.

Ongoing

Hiroshima Mon Amour (Alain Resnais) at Film Forum. Details. DCP. 1959. 90 min. 4:50 and 9:10 pm.
Vertigo (Alfred Hitchcock) at Film Forum. Details. DCP. 1958. 128 min. 12:45, 3:30, 7:00 and 9:45 pm.
Goodbye to Language (Jean-Luc Godard) at Film Society of Lincoln Center. Details. 3D DCP. 2014. 70 min. 11:45 am, 1:30, 3:20, 5:30, 7:30, 9:20 pm.
Goodbye to Language (Jean-Luc Godard) at IFC Center. Details. 3D DCP. 2014. 70 min. 10:35, 12:05, 1:45, 3:30, 5:15, 7:05, 8:50, and 10:30 pm.

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Museums

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Wednesday, October 29 | Adieu au langage at IFC Center

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What’s Showing Today? Wednesday, October 29
Click venue names for ticket info & directions

Featured Screening: Adieu au langage at IFC Center. Post by Vanessa McDonnell:

Adieu au langage is divided into alternating and interspersed sections titled Nature and Metaphor, the material in each section referring constantly to its antithesis and both coyly mediated by Godard’s established cinematic system of signs. 3D is a logical formal element for Godard to put to use alongside his usual parallel but occasionally incongruous streams of image and sound, translated versus untranslated utterances (one hears unsubtitled mention of Mao and Che), his characteristic abruptions (ie. dramatic strings, interrupted), and his employment of supplementary and shifting texts such as old films and philosophical works. All of these are coupled with his mischievous sense of humor and sincere political concern, with 3D giving Adieu au Langage a layer that is both highly aggressive, which is not unwelcome, as well as sublime. At certain points, Godard allows one of the two cameras which are capturing the 3D image to pan left or right to follow a moving subject, creating a superimposition in which only one subject can be seen if you close one of your eyes, resulting in a gloriously destabilizing visual experience to match his rugged conceptual terrain. In the screening I attended, the film elicited audible expressions of shock, illness and joyful excitement.

“Is society willing to accept murder as a means to fighting unemployment?” “Is it possible to form a concept about Africa?” “Everyone can stop god from existing, but no one does.” These and other questions and propositions are pondered by various characters, including those playing out a melodramatic meta-narrative involving a hit man, a woman and a getaway car against the backdrop of some of the drabbest corners of a provincial town. As in Film Socialisme, there is a ship, this time seen only from shore. Perhaps Godard became superstitious after the disaster that beset the Costa Concordia, on which Film Socialisme was filmed. Another man and woman endure a domestic drama in a small apartment, where they eat, defecate, watch variously mundane/shocking things on a television and ponder the nature of their subjectivity vis a vis language. Godard’s own dog appears, blissfully unaware of the cognitive and social constraints and mystifications of such systems of signification, and runs happily through the woods, pawing, scratching and digging. It also receives our sentimental projections, and we’re embarrassed at that. —Vanessa McDonnell

Also Noted

The Industrial Terror screenings have been a total blast. Just a note on tonight’s shows: William Girdler‘s notorious (and, all have remarked, surprisingly great) blaxploitation Exorcist rip-off Abby, shot in Louisville, KY, screens from the only known 16mm print in existence. It’s a little worse for the wear, but conveys character. And the almost equally rare Homebodies, never available on video, shows from 35mm. This story of aging tenement residents in Cincinnati who hatch a homicidal plan to combat urban renewal is the kind of repertory catch you’ll shudder to think you may have missed—a singular mix of Grand Guignol humor, sophisticated social perspective, and some of cinema’s most poignant commentary on aging. It shows with 16mm print of director Larry Yust‘s adult-oriented health short Live or Die, a pre- and post-mortem dissection of poor health decisions that have led to premature death. Full of sadistic smash cuts to undulating human viscera under the blade of the doctor’s scalpel, it’s unexpectedly perhaps the goriest film in the series. —Jon Dieringer

Today

Industrial Terror at Anthology Film Archives
Series Details

  • Abby (William Girdler). Details. 16mm. 1974. 89 min. 6:45 pm.
  • Homebodies with Live or Die (Larry Yust) Details. 35mm/16mm. 1974. 96 min. 9:00 pm.

Acteurism: The Emergence of Ann Sheridan, 1937-1943 at MoMA
Series Details

  • They Drive by Night (Raoul Walsh). Details. 1940. 95 min. 1:30 pm.

To Save and Project: The 12th MoMA International Festival of Film Preservation at MoMA
Series Details

  • Todo Modo (Elio Petri). Details. 1976. 125 min. 4:00 pm.
  • Shark Monroe (William S. Hart). Details. 1918. 60 min. 7:15 pm.

Bill Morrison: Compositions at MoMA
Series Details

  • Decasia. Details. 2002. 67 min. 4:30 pm.

Filmmaker in Focus: Nuri Bilge Ceylan at MoMA
Series Details

  • Winter Sleep. Details. 2014. 196 min. 7:00 pm.

Round Midnight (Bertrand Tavernier) at BAMcinématekDetails. 35mm. 1986. 133 min. 9:00 pm.
Forked Tongue In Cheek: A Live Score by Night Pumpkin at Spectacle. Details. 8:00 and 10:00 pm.

Ongoing

Hiroshima Mon Amour (Alain Resnais) at Film Forum. Details. DCP. 1959. 90 min. 4:50 and 9:10 pm.
Vertigo (Alfred Hitchcock) at Film Forum. Details. DCP. 1958. 128 min. 12:45, 3:30, 7:00 and 9:45 pm.
Goodbye to Language (Jean-Luc Godard) at Film Society of Lincoln Center. Details. 3D DCP. 2014. 70 min. 11:45 am, 1:30, 3:20, 5:30, 7:30, 9:20 pm.
Goodbye to Language (Jean-Luc Godard) at IFC Center. Details. 3D DCP. 2014. 70 min. 10:35, 12:05, 1:45, 3:30, 5:15, 7:05, 8:50, and 10:30 pm.

Galleries

Museums

Brooklyn